Build A Beautiful Organic Garden With These Tips

If you’re looking to have a healthier diet, think about starting an organic garden. However, organic gardening does require a commitment. This can leave you wondering where to start when it comes to organic gardening.

Gardeners who are intrigued by the ideas of organic and sustainable methods should think about designating a portion of their landscape to support native plants and animals. The kind of birds and insects needed for pollination will be naturally present on your property and help with your organic garden.

Make sure you have your gardening tools near you, so you can maximize your gardening efficiency. Put them into a basket you carry with you, or use an apron with many pockets and hanging loops. Keep your gloves, a trowel, small pruning shears and other tools handy and make quick work of your garden maintenance.

Use several inches of organic materials for mulch in your flower beds. This will prevent weeds from growing, retain humidity, and feed your plants with the nutrients they need. Mulch also completes your garden, giving it a finished appearance.

Pine is a wonderful mulch so do not discard the idea. Some plants are highly acidic, and like soil that is acidic too. Pine needles are an excellent form of mulch for these types of plants. Lay a few inches of needles over the beds to allow them to decompose and add some acid to your soil.

Coffee Grounds

Add coffee grounds to your garden’s soil. Coffee grounds are filled with nitrogen, that is a nutrient required by plants. Using coffee grounds or any other source of nitrogen contributes to the growth of taller, fuller blooms.

Old laundry baskets are handy tools at harvest time. The laundry basket is a perfect strainer for any produce run off. You can clean and rinse the harvest when it is the laundry basket and the water will go out of the holes.

Use equal parts dried and green plant material for your own compost. “Green” material refers to things like wilted flowers, weeds, leaves from your yard, and grass clippings. Dried plant material includes straw, sawdust, shredded paper, cardboard, and dried and cut-up woody material. Diseased plants, meat and fire-waste like charcoal or ashes should not be placed in your compost pile.

As you’ve just read, organic gardening does require research, effort, and hard work in order to begin growing organic plants on your own. It is also true that in order to see results, that you have to keep at it. With the advice from this article, you are now ready to begin a successful organic gardening adventure.