Cultivating An Organic Garden – Tips To Use Right Now

In order to be a good organic gardener, you need to have a lot of patience and a knack for how to take care of plants. The idea here is to grow healthy, great-tasting food bereft of pesticides, herbicides and other unnatural chemical enhancers. However, organic gardening obviously isn’t as easy as it might sound. Continue on for some helpful advice that will have you gardening like a pro.

A good tip to help your plants stay healthy and fight diseases is to use aspirin water. An aspirin and a half, dissolved in about two gallons of fresh water, is great for your plants. Simply spray your plants with the mixture, and this will help them fend off various diseases. Spray them once about every three weeks.

Gardeners who are intrigued by the ideas of organic and sustainable methods should think about designating a portion of their landscape to support native plants and animals. A natural area will allow beneficial birds and insects, many of which pollinate plants, to live on your property and help your garden grow stronger.

If you are growing plants inside of your home, you need to keep the thermostat set to 65 to 75 degrees during the day. The temperature needs to remain steady and warm so the plants can grow. If there are times during the year when you would prefer not to have the temperature that high, another solution you can utilize is to purchase heat lamps for your organic plants.

Do not let your gardening chores add up. Even if you end up being too busy to do garden chores every day, do small tasks that will help you avoid having to do large tasks when you finally do have time. For example, snatch out a weed or two whenever you pass by the garden, such as when you take your dog out for a potty break.

Is there a natural way to kill weeds? Put down old newspapers in several layers for controlling weeds. Like any other plant, weeds need to be exposed to the sun. Newspapers placed atop weeds will starve them from light and they will eventually die. Newspapers tend to break down into compost nicely. Add visual appeal by placing some mulch over the top.

When planting seeds you should cover them with fine soil. Determine its depth by looking at the seed’s size and multiplying it by three. Certain seeds are an exception to that rule, since they require sunlight to germinate, so they should be barely covered or not at all. Two of the common examples are petunias and ageratum. If you are unsure about your seed’s requirements for sunlight, the resources are often provided along with the seeds, or you can find out online.

It can be hard to grow an organic garden without chemicals, but the end result is worth the effort. Even though the claims of the chemicals may be astounding, the organic way is always going to provide the best reward to you and whoever is eating your crops.

Too much water may hurt plants since extra water can keep roots from getting the nutrients they need from the soil. Check the weather for the next couple of days to see if you actually need to water your plants. You may want to skip the watering during a day that will receive significant rainfall.

Grow some garlic that is organic. Cloves should be planted whole during the fall or early spring months. Garlic grows best in soil that retains moisture but drains well. Set them four inches apart, approximately one to two inches deep into the soil, with their ends up. As your garlic shoots grow, you can cut them and use them instead of scallions or chives. When the tops of the bulbs turn brown, they’re ready to harvest. The bulbs should be dried well by the sun for a few days before storing. The garlic may then be stored within a cool location tied together in bunches or simply loose.

Organic Gardening

The hobby of organic gardening will take dedication, patience and a little bit of help from Mother Nature. The rewards are healthy, delicious foods without the harsh chemicals of today’s corporate farming practices. This article is full of advice that you can use, along with a little old-fashioned hard work, to get off to a great start in organic gardening.