Garden The Organic Way With These Great Tips!

Gardening is a surprisingly complicated subject at times. If you decide to go the natural route, you may have to know about things like the pH balance of soil and natural bug-fighting concoctions. If you are just getting started, growing organic may be trying. Keep reading to find out how the professionals do it.

If you have a high priority for sustainability in your organic gardening, try leaving a corner of the property undeveloped as a mini wildlife refuge. Wildlife can help the plants in your garden to thrive, as insects support plant reproduction, while the excrement of many species contains nutrients which can help to fertilize your soil.

It’s simple to quickly prepare your soil for the planting of a perennial garden. Turn over the soil in your garden so it will be soft and easy to plant before spreading wood chips around your garden. Let the area sit for a couple weeks, then begin digging into it and planting your new perennials.

Seeds that have sprouted don’t require the extra warmth that was needed before they sprouted. It’s important to move the plants away from any heat source as they grow larger. If you have plastic films on your containers, remove them. Watch your seeds closely to find the right time to do this.

Use about two to three inches of organic material as mulch in all of your flower beds. By doing this, you can lock in moisture, discourage weed growth, and nourish your plants. It also adds a uniform and cohesive look to the garden.

Have some plastic bags on hand that you can put over your gardening shoes if they are muddy. This way, you won’t break momentum by fussing with your shoes, and you’ll be quickly back in the garden to finish your work.

Space is very important when you plant an organic garden. It’s common to not think about how much space a plant will need once it’s full grown, and you don’t want to crowd your garden. The plants will inevitably need to unfurl and spread, but they also need the circulation of air from open spaces. Plan your garden carefully and leave enough space between the seeds.

Plant Material

Include both green and dry plant refuse in your compost. Green plant material can include items such as leftover produce waste, grass clippings and leaves. Sawdust, straw, cardboard, paper and wood pulp are all examples of dried plant material. Avoid using animal manure, charcoal or diseased plants in your compost.

Now, you shouldn’t get your hopes up and believe that a few tips are going to turn you into an instant professional gardener. However, these tips are a great starting point if you do plan to grow organically. As you implement these tips and hone your skills, you’ll be a professional green-thumb-holder in no time.